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Book Recommendations?


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Greetings: 

 

I recently started reading a book I bought a couple of years ago with the irresistible title -  "Taming Your Inner Brat"!!

 

I'm about 2/3 of the way through and I intend to buy a copy for several people I know :-)

 

I have 'borrowed' some info from the Amazon website, as I don't think I'd be very good at writing a book review right now as I am supposed to be .... writing a book!!!

 

Here's what Amazon says:

 

Why did I say that?" "I can’t believe I ate all that!" "What was I thinking?"

 

Every one of us has said or done something that we later regret, even though we know better. And we’re likely to do it over and over again. There are specific reasons why we repeat such patterns, reasons embodied in a concept called the "inner brat." Not a psychiatric diagnosis, this inner brat nevertheless gets us into trouble. Taming Your Inner Brat explores the inner brat in all of us, explaining its psychological roots in early childhood and why bratty thoughts, feelings, and behaviors persist. It also addresses social and cultural conditions that encourage the self-centeredness and sense of entitlement upon which the inner brat thrives. Learn to recognize the inner brat and acquire specific strategies and skills, based on the latest research from experts in the field, to bring it under control. This book is about personal responsibility. We are not victims of our own impulses, addictions, or bad memories. No longer can we say, "The devil made me do it," or, "It’s my parents’ fault." Dr. Wallin shows us how to view ourselves objectively to bring problems into manageable perspective and make changes that last.

 

From the Publisher

This book is like a good friend who loves you for yourself but who will also call you on your sneaky moves, excuses, and rationalizations. We like its humor, directness, and ability to provide a fresh angle on a problem as old as humanity: the inner brat inside us all.

 

About the Author

Pauline Wallin, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist in private practice. For the past twenty-six years, she has helped hundreds of people understand and productively deal with self-defeating behavior patterns.

 

 

 

You can read more about it here:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/1885171854/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books

 

But if that doesn't work, just type the title into www.amazon.com

 

Anyone else got any book recommendations that have been particularly helpful or inspiring?  I could make this list HUGE but I'll keep it to just one for now :-)

 

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This is one I read years ago and still have on my bookshelf. (Usually I read a book and pass it on.)

 

Feel the Fear . . . and Do It Anyway by Susan Jeffers.\

 

This is from one of the reviews:

 

"It's not the kind of book you read once only to emerge a changed person, rather, it gets your mind going. After one reading, you'll find yourself quoting passages as if someone has "found you out". You will catch yourself in conversation when you say weak phrases like "I can't, I should, It's a problem" only to change them mid-sentance to empowering words such as "I won't, I could, and It's an opportunity".

 

Read it twice. It will impact you deeply. It will teach you to take responsibility. There is no silver bullet. Self-awareness is the real path to self-improvement. I loved it."

 

Me, too.  :)

 

 

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Sounds very familiar Beeps... I am sure someone recommended it to me at some point.. but now I shall definitely  check it out!  Now you got my brain going trying to remember where I heard about it...  :idiot:

 

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Hope and Help for your Nerves. By Claire Weeks.

Oldie but goodie.

Very helpful for anxiety, panic and insomnia. 

 

WOW!!  These were recommended to me some 20 years ago...  they were the thing  helped bring me out of a long spell of agoraphobia and everything that goes with it. When I say 'these' it's because she wrote several books on the same theme, all of them extremely helpful and ground-breaking at the time.  I don't know if she is still around, but if I remember correctly she's an Aussie.. or maybe even a Kiwi!  ( hey Spring!)

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Hope and Help for your Nerves. By Claire Weeks.

Oldie but goodie.

Very helpful for anxiety, panic and insomnia. 

 

WOW!!  These were recommended to me some 20 years ago...  they were the thing  helped bring me out of a long spell of agoraphobia and everything that goes with it. When I say 'these' it's because she wrote several books on the same theme, all of them extremely helpful and ground-breaking at the time.  I don't know if she is still around, but if I remember correctly she's an Aussie.. or maybe even a Kiwi!   ( hey Spring!)

 

Yep, she's an Aussie. I do believe she has passed. I've had that book since the early '80's. It was my mom's, and I gave it to my crazy boyfriend.  :laugh:

I picked it up again last year, and I can honestly say it's the most helpful thing i"ve ever read regarding insomnia. And I"ve got shelves of insomnia books. They all suck!

It's pretty torn and tattered now.

I have a post in the insomnia board. It's a quote from her book    http://www.benzobuddies.org/forum/index.php?topic=7416.msg81783#msg81783 

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Here's a link to a Wikipedia article on Dr. Weekes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Weekes. She did indeed pass away in 1990.

 

This book is available on Amazon where almost everyone gives it rave reviews. Thanks, Eljay, for the recommendation. I plan on ordering it ASAP!

 

Lynne

 

Good to hear Lynne! Let me know how you like it. It's a treasure.  ;)

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I'll definitely agree with the Claire Weekes recommendation. She was WAY ahead of her time in treating anxiety. In fact, the newest ACT therapy is basically the same principals that Claire Weekes talked about. There's an audio recording by her you can download from iTunes called "Pass Through Panic". When I listened to it I was blown away. It was the first time I've ever heard anyone describe EXACTLY how I felt and what I was going through. To think it was recorded in the 60's is even more astounding. So check that out as well if you're interested!

 

Another book that I've found to be pretty amazing is called "The Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Anxiety: A Guide to Breaking Free from Anxiety, Phobias, and Worry Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy"

 

I can't recommend this book enough!

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I'll definitely agree with the Claire Weekes recommendation. She was WAY ahead of her time in treating anxiety. In fact, the newest ACT therapy is basically the same principals that Claire Weekes talked about. There's an audio recording by her you can download from iTunes called "Pass Through Panic". When I listened to it I was blown away. It was the first time I've ever heard anyone describe EXACTLY how I felt and what I was going through. To think it was recorded in the 60's is even more astounding. So check that out as well if you're interested!

 

Another book that I've found to be pretty amazing is called "The Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Anxiety: A Guide to Breaking Free from Anxiety, Phobias, and Worry Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy"

 

I can't recommend this book enough!

 

Thanks for both those recommendations, r3.  I'm going to get them both.  :thumbsup:

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Thanks for both those recommendations, r3.  I'm going to get them both.  :thumbsup:

 

Cool! I'll be interested to know what you think of them!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another great book is "What to Say When you Talk To Yourself" by Shad Helmstetter.  As I remember, the basic premise is that our brain accepts what we tell it regardless of the accuracy or truthfulness of what we say.  That means we can tell ourselves positive things that we don't even believe are true and still the brain will act on it if we say it often enough.  We can reprogram our brains.  I used to avoid affirmations because I thought "Who are you kidding?  You don't really believe that is true". But this book explained that I don't have to believe an affirmation is true for it to work towards making it true. Does that make any sense?

 

Here's from one consumer's review of the book:

 

 

"I  work as a therapist in the mental health field and regularly read Self-Help books for myself and to incorporate into treatment programs. Many of these books have interesting theories which don't work or are too tedious to use with individuals seeking quick solutions to problems. This book teaches us that we literally become what we think and tell ourselves. Other books have touched on this concept in the past, but this book teaches us quick and easy methods to stop unwanted thinking/behaviour patterns - to "erase and replace" our negative thoughts with ones which will build our success. Prior to reading this book approximately 10 years ago - this technique required many hours of written assignments and counselling. Individuals now have a simple and effective tool to make permanent positive change in their lives by learning the right things to say to themselves. It reduces the need for prolonged psychotherapy through professionals because it allows to become our own therapist. This book goes beyond positive thinking, it is more than wishful thinking with no concrete instructions on how to achieve happiness. This is a quick and easy method to create any level of change an individual desires -by using specific self-talk words and scripts throughout their day. I give this book to every patient that I believe is serious about making positive change in their life! "

 

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Twenty love poems and a desperate song. by Pablo Neruda (Nobel Prize in Literature). A very short book, but if you are romantic, it will touch your soul. I once read a very good translation into English but I do not remember the name of the translator.
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"Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life with the Heart of a Buddha" by Tara Brach, PhD.  It's changed my life and given me some tools on how I cope with life in general. 

 

Lots of great recommendations here!  I will look into some of these.  I love to read anything on mindfulness that I can get my hands on.  A friend just read one of Pablo Neruda's poems to me recently.  It was amazing and beautiful.

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  • 5 weeks later...

"Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life with the Heart of a Buddha" by Tara Brach, PhD.  It's changed my life and given me some tools on how I cope with life in general.

 

Tara Brach is GREAT. Did you know he has online audio talks you can listen to? There's usually a new one every week. You can find them on iTunes or at her site: imcw.org/audio-dharma

 

Mindfulness is one of the only methods that has actually made a big difference in my anxiety. Of course, a lot of it is being caused by the withdrawal right now so it's hard to manage, but it still helps a lot!

 

If you're interested in mindfulness, you might want to check this out: actforanxiety.com/ACTforAnxiety_Study_Index.html

 

They're looking for people to take part in their study. I have this workbook and have used it, so I'm not eligible.     :(

 

Removed hot link, T2

 

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  • 10 months later...

I'm reading some new books that I think will be helpful to me so decided to revive this old thread.  The one I'm currently reading is "The Biology of Belief" by Burce Lipton, PhD.  This write-up is from Amazon.com:

 

"Through the research of Dr. Lipton and other leading-edge scientists, stunning new discoveries have been made about the interaction between your mind and body and the processes by which cells receive information. It shows that genes and DNA do not control our biology, that instead DNA is controlled by signals from outside the cell, including the energetic messages emanating from our thoughts. Using simple language, illustrations, humor, and everyday examples, he demonstrates how the new science of Epigenetics is revolutionizing our understanding of the link between mind and matter and the profound effects it has on our personal lives and the collective life of our species."

 

I'm not real far into it and have had to skip over some of the more technical passages but I'm getting excited about where it's going.  I think all of us have heard of the body-mind connection and about how our thoughts influence our reality but little about how it actually works.  Some people can just take it on faith but I do better understanding the scientific basis.  Anyway, I think there are some other members of the forum of like mind so take it for what it's worth.  I have also requested the following related books from the library:  "The Intention Experiment" and "Evolve Your Brain". 

 

BTW, I couldn't concentrate enough to read even a magazine article when I first started tapering.  One of the true healing signs for me was when I could start enjoying reading again. 

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