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I am trying to get off the lorazapam and am now having some difficulties.  My pill size is 0.5

 

I was at 1/4 pill in AM and 1/2 in PM for a few weeks, then went to 1/4 pill both in the AM and the PM for a week.  It was a little rough but i was handling it OK.  Now I dropped the day dose and seem to be having problems that have been getting worse each day.  I am on day 5.  I am trying to stick it out but I wake up around 4:30 and have what I think is a rebound.  I also am having really bad dry mouth, some eye twitching, teeth grinding and some GI distress.  Is it common to have diarrhea when having the withdrawal symptoms?  Also, I seem to feel better when the two doses are equal and feel worse in the when the PM dose is bigger than the AM dose.  

 

I have 60 2 mg Valium from my doc but was hoping to not have to add another drug.  If i switch to Valium can I just drop the lorazapam?

 

Any advise would be great.

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Hello rockstar, Welcome to BenzoBuddies!

 

It sounds like you have a good taper plan going.  We recommend cutting your total dose by 10% every 7 to 14 days.  You might have cut your AM dose a little too soon, but not by much.  The symptoms you describe are very common and normal for this process.  It seems to me that if you continue with your current taper, you'll be done in a very short time.  If you decide to do a cross over to Valium, we can help you with that.  Crossing over to Valium won't eliminate your discomfort and it will extend the time you'll be tapering because there has to be a smooth transition to the new drug.  Another idea would be to get the .25 pills and cut them into quarters, this would slow your taper down a little more and maybe you'd have less discomfort.  Or another idea would be to do titration.  Lots of options here, let us know what sounds good to you.

 

Have you read the Ashton Manual?  It contains a lot of information about symptoms, plus it has a conversion plan from Lorazepam to Valium.  I wanted to give you a link to it, but I'm downloading some software right now and my computer is running really slow.  But, I wanted to welcome you.

 

Pam

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Thanks Pam.

 

Do you think I should add the 1/4 pill in the AM to reduce the discomfort.  It is pretty rough in the morning and afternoon.  I feel like I am constantly clenching my teeth and have multiple loose stools.  You sadi this is normal.  How long should it last and how should I reduce or drop the PM dose.  If I were to switch to Valium should I start by taking the 2 mg in the AM and stay with the 1/4 lorazapam in the PM for a feww weeks and then switch to 2 mg valium each in AM and PM?

 

I have looked over the ashton manual but I fell that I am at such a low dose that I do not know how to do a valium switch.

 

If the discomfort will go away soon then I do not mind staying where I am at but I am nervous that I am in for long term effects from going to fast?

 

 

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Thanks Pam.

 

Do you think I should add the 1/4 pill in the AM to reduce the discomfort.  It is pretty rough in the morning and afternoon.  I feel like I am constantly clenching my teeth and have multiple loose stools.  You sadi this is normal.  How long should it last and how should I reduce or drop the PM dose.  If I were to switch to Valium should I start by taking the 2 mg in the AM and stay with the 1/4 lorazapam in the PM for a feww weeks and then switch to 2 mg valium each in AM and PM?

 

I have looked over the ashton manual but I fell that I am at such a low dose that I do not know how to do a valium switch.

 

If the discomfort will go away soon then I do not mind staying where I am at but I am nervous that I am in for long term effects from going to fast?

 

 

 

Hi rockstar,

 

Welcome to BenzoBuddies!!

 

How long were you taking the Lorazepam? How did you do your taper? Did you cut by 1/4 of your .50mg tablet every couple of weeks? You could crush the .125mg piece you take in the pm, mix into 1/2 cup of milk or water and divided your dose to two times a day by drinking 1/4 c of the dose for the am and 1/4 c for the pm. Does this make sense?

 

T2 :smitten:

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Thanks Pam.

 

Do you think I should add the 1/4 pill in the AM to reduce the discomfort.  It is pretty rough in the morning and afternoon.  I feel like I am constantly clenching my teeth and have multiple loose stools.  You sadi this is normal.  How long should it last and how should I reduce or drop the PM dose.  If I were to switch to Valium should I start by taking the 2 mg in the AM and stay with the 1/4 lorazapam in the PM for a feww weeks and then switch to 2 mg valium each in AM and PM?

 

I have looked over the ashton manual but I fell that I am at such a low dose that I do not know how to do a valium switch.

 

If the discomfort will go away soon then I do not mind staying where I am at but I am nervous that I am in for long term effects from going to fast?

 

 

 

Hi rockstar,

 

You're probably right about a switch to Valium, you're at a pretty low dose.  There's no way to know if you're going to suffer as a result of going too fast.  If you can stand it, I'd suggest staying on your current dose for a few more days.  Then you can do like Theresa suggested and do a simple titration. 

 

Pam

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WELCOME :) :) :)

 

I am not tapering but wanted you to know that you are not alone.  I went c/t on 9/2/09 from 1 mg klonopin....very hard. (Do Not Go Cold Turkey....slow turkey they say)  I understand the physical, mental and emotional pains of this process. 

 

You have come to the right place.  Lots of people who understand and have been where you are at in this process. 

 

We are here for you!  Be patient with yourself and know that you are healing.

 

MelissaJ

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I was on Xanax for a few weeks and then was switched to Lorazapam.  I have been on the stuff since early June of this year.  At most I have taken up to 1 mg a day.  I took 1/2 in the AM and a full in the PM for a month or so then tried to drop the AM and had a hard time and went back.  Then started again and got to 1/2 in the AM and PM for a few weeks, then 1/4 in AM and 1/2 in PM for a few weeks, then 1/4 in AM and PM for a week, and now just 1/4 in PM.  I always feel OK or even better for the first two days then on the third I get a pretty good headache and some GI distress.  Teeth grinding and ear ringing also.  Seems to get better after a week which is why I dropped the AM dose only after a week.  Also, I seem to feel better when the doses are the same and when the dose is larger in the PM, I get a wicked rebond in the AM and feel crappy most of the day.  I usually feel better in the evening even before taking the PM dose.

 

I plan to stay where i am for another week and then maybe drop the PM dose or even try to get a 1/8 tab?

 

It is a good idea to maybe add a 1/8 AM dose for a little bit?

 

I just want this to go smooth and want to avoid any long term symptoms.

 

Thanks for all your help.

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It is very common to have loose stools at this point. I had horrible GI issues, grinding teeth, tremors for weeks up until the middle of my taper from 1mg of Lorazepam.  My mornings were also VERY rough. Try to hang in there if you can for 10 days, your brain is having the recalibrate.

 

I suggest consulting with your Dr on the dosage switch from L to V. I am currently down to a small amount; it was one of hardest things I have ever had to do.

 

Anna

 

I am trying to get off the lorazapam and am now having some difficulties.  My pill size is 0.5

 

I was at 1/4 pill in AM and 1/2 in PM for a few weeks, then went to 1/4 pill both in the AM and the PM for a week.  It was a little rough but i was handling it OK.  Now I dropped the day dose and seem to be having problems that have been getting worse each day.  I am on day 5.  I am trying to stick it out but I wake up around 4:30 and have what I think is a rebound.  I also am having really bad dry mouth, some eye twitching, teeth grinding and some GI distress.  Is it common to have diarrhea when having the withdrawal symptoms?  Also, I seem to feel better when the two doses are equal and feel worse in the when the PM dose is bigger than the AM dose.  

 

I have 60 2 mg Valium from my doc but was hoping to not have to add another drug.  If i switch to Valium can I just drop the lorazapam?

 

Any advise would be great.

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How long should the GI distress last.  It seems that each other time I dropped a dose it only lasted a few days and this time seems to be a little worse.  Is 10 days tthe usual time it takes to adjust to a reduced dose.  If this is the case I def. went too fast in dropping the daily 1/4 tab since it was only about 6 days after the previous dose.

 

When one does make a step too fast as I have is it better to go back and start again or tough it out?

 

My doc told me to stop the lorazapam and switch to valium without a slow crossover so I did not do it.  If I were can somebody help with a plan for that?

 

The mornings are really tough, I wake up around 5 AM and seem to have a rebound effect as i am really anxious and hmy heat is racing and that is when I have the brunt of the GI distress.  I take my PM dose at around 8 or 9 PM.

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I was on Xanax for a few weeks and then was switched to Lorazapam.  I have been on the stuff since early June of this year.  At most I have taken up to 1 mg a day.  I took 1/2 in the AM and a full in the PM for a month or so then tried to drop the AM and had a hard time and went back.  Then started again and got to 1/2 in the AM and PM for a few weeks, then 1/4 in AM and 1/2 in PM for a few weeks, then 1/4 in AM and PM for a week, and now just 1/4 in PM.  I always feel OK or even better for the first two days then on the third I get a pretty good headache and some GI distress.  Teeth grinding and ear ringing also.  Seems to get better after a week which is why I dropped the AM dose only after a week.  Also, I seem to feel better when the doses are the same and when the dose is larger in the PM, I get a wicked rebond in the AM and feel crappy most of the day.  I usually feel better in the evening even before taking the PM dose.

 

I plan to stay where i am for another week and then maybe drop the PM dose or even try to get a 1/8 tab?

 

It is a good idea to maybe add a 1/8 AM dose for a little bit?

 

I just want this to go smooth and want to avoid any long term symptoms.

 

Thanks for all your help.

 

I know you're suffering, but in terms of what we normally see around here; you're doing quite well.  I feel you should stay at your PM dose for a few more days.  Then do the simple titration with the liquid that Theresa suggested.  Adding an AM dose would be going backwards at this point.  No matter what you do to try and juggle your schedule, you're still going to suffer. 

 

You were on a relatively low dose for a short time.  I don't see you suffering for too long once you're off.  It's hard to judge, but from what I've seen you could start to feel good about a month after your last dose.

 

Continue as you are, on PM dose of 1/4 tablet.  Then do the simple titration for another week to 2 weeks and jump from there.

 

Hang out with us while you're doing this, we'll help you to know that the symptoms are normal and will leave you as you heal.  You're doing great!

 

 

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How long should the GI distress last.  It seems that each other time I dropped a dose it only lasted a few days and this time seems to be a little worse.  Is 10 days tthe usual time it takes to adjust to a reduced dose.  If this is the case I def. went too fast in dropping the daily 1/4 tab since it was only about 6 days after the previous dose.

 

When one does make a step too fast as I have is it better to go back and start again or tough it out?

 

My doc told me to stop the lorazapam and switch to valium without a slow crossover so I did not do it.  If I were can somebody help with a plan for that?

 

The mornings are really tough, I wake up around 5 AM and seem to have a rebound effect as i am really anxious and hmy heat is racing and that is when I have the brunt of the GI distress.  I take my PM dose at around 8 or 9 PM.

 

For some folks the lower they get, the more they suffer.  This is a normal part of this process.  If you feel strongly about going back up in your dose and tapering slower then by all means do it.  It won't hurt you to continue your taper from here though.  Hard to say how long the GI distress will last, it's all part of the process. 

 

I really don't see the point of crossing to Valium at this point.  Some find it difficult to do and it comes with it's own set of problems.  You're so close to being off, it doesn't make sense to me.  It's up to you though and we can help you make a plan. 

 

I wanted you to see this about morning anxiety, it might help you understand better what's happening. 

 

Understanding Early Morning Anxiety

By Deanne Repich

           

Are mornings the worst time for your anxiety? When the alarm clock rings do you experience a feeling of dread? Do the symptoms kick in, making you tempted to roll over and snooze for hours so you don't have to face the day?

 

One reason why anxiety can be worse in the morning is that waking up is a sharp contrast to the sleep environment, which is perceived as pleasant for most people.

 

Picture this: You're sleeping peacefully in your warm, cozy bed, (for some, after many hours of insomnia). You are at peace, finally getting a break from the cares and tasks of the day. Then, BOOM! Suddenly, the shrill sound of your alarm clock jerks you awake. It triggers the "fight or flight" response, our body's inborn self-protective mechanism. And to top it off, the room is cold and dark. The dreaded worries and symptoms kick in.

 

There are several things you can do to make your "waking up" environment more pleasant. For example, get a radio alarm clock that wakes you up to your favorite music. Another alternative is an alarm clock that wakes you up gradually with pleasant chimes of increasing volume and frequency.

 

Keep a robe and slippers next to the bed so that you can warm up quickly and minimize a drop in body temperature as you get out of bed. If the bright lights of the room bother you, install a dimmer switch near your bed. You can gradually increase the light's intensity over a period of several minutes after you awaken.

 

Another reason why symptoms can be worse in the morning is because your blood sugar is low when you first wake up. You have gone all night without food. It's important to maintain a constant blood sugar level because the brain uses glucose as its fuel. If blood sugar levels are too low or drop too fast, then the brain starts running out of fuel. This causes the brain to trigger the "fight or flight" response.

 

The "fight or flight" response sends a rush of adrenaline, cortisol, and other neurotransmitters through your body to prepare you to fight or flee the perceived threat (low fuel). This process can trigger physical reactions ("symptoms") such as trembling, rapid heartbeat, sweating, panic attacks, fatigue, insomnia, mental confusion, nervousness, dizziness, and more.

 

To balance your blood sugar levels and minimize symptoms, keep a snack that contains "good" complex carbohydrates and protein by your bed. Eat it when you first wake up. You will likely notice that your symptoms improve shortly after eating the snack. You might try a combination of whole grain crackers and a handful of nuts, or a high-protein granola bar with some whole-wheat pretzels. The "good" carbohydrates will give you energy, and the protein will help to keep your blood sugar level steady over time.

 

Finally, dead-end thoughts play a huge role in creating early morning anxiety, as well as anxiety at any other time of day. Once you learn to overcome dead-end thoughts, you stop the anxiety cycle in its tracks.

 

Dead-end thoughts are negative, anxious, obsessive, or racing thoughts, that do not promote your well-being. They are based on faulty thinking patterns. These thoughts of helplessness, negativity, or anxious predictions about the future, give away your personal power and create the anxiety cycle. Here are a few examples of dead-end thoughts:

 

    * "I can't get out of bed feeling like this."

    * "Why do I feel this way? There must be something really wrong with me!"

    * "Everything is going to go wrong at the work meeting."

    * "It's a horrible day."

    * "When will this ever stop!"

 

The most important thing you can do to conquer early morning anxiety is to change how you PERCEIVE waking up. Change the dead-end thoughts that create the anxiety. Remember, physical symptoms by themselves are not anxiety. Negative perceptions are what create and perpetuate the anxiety cycle.

 

Choose to perceive waking up as a positive event - yes, you have a choice! Habitual dead-end thoughts can be unlearned and replaced with healthier self-talk. Of course, like any new skill you learn, it requires practice and patient persistence on your part to make healthier thoughts automatic.

 

Change your perception by creating a morning ritual that replaces the dead-end thoughts with healthier ones. Create a sequence of positive steps you can take when you first wake up to conquer early morning anxiety.

 

Positive rituals are helpful because they get you fully involved in the present moment (instead of the future), by focusing on one task at one time. Make the ritual automatic by taking the same steps every day in the same sequence. Here is an example of an anxiety-busting morning ritual. Use the ideas in this ritual as a starting off point to help you create your own personalized morning ritual.

 

    * Step 1: As you get ready for bed at night, place your alarm clock out of arm's reach from the bed. This action will motivate you to get out of bed to turn off the alarm when it rings the following morning.

 

      When the alarm rings, get out of bed immediately. Turn off the alarm and put on the robe next to your bed. As you do so, say aloud three times in an enthusiastic, cheery voice: "I am SO glad to be alive! What a WONDERFUL day!" Make sure to smile as you do this.

 

    * Step 2: Mentally and physically "check in" with the present moment. Accept any physical sensations without placing a negative judgment on them. Simply observe. Touch your face, hands, and legs a few times and observe the sensations. Focus intently on a few items in the room for several seconds. These simple activities help you to switch your focus from the future back to the present moment.

 

      If dead-end thoughts occur at this time (which they likely will), immediately replace them with healthier thoughts. It often helps to say the positive thoughts aloud. For example, if you're thinking: "I can't get out of bed feeling like this," replace it with: "These physical sensations might be uncomfortable, yet I know they are harmless. I am completely safe. I am physically able to get out of bed and have a great day. Watch. I can get out of bed just fine!" Then DO it!

 

    * Step 3: Turn on your favorite upbeat music CD. (Keep a CD player in your bedroom.) Sing along and dance for a minute or two.

 

    * Step 4: Eat the snack on your bedside table to help level your blood sugar.

 

    * Step 5: Take a shower and dress. Then continue with your day.

 

Once you find a pattern that works for you, use the same morning ritual -- the same steps in the same sequence -- every day. Repetition helps you to effectively unlearn old thoughts and behaviors and make the new ones automatic

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This is terrific! Thank you Pam.

 

How long should the GI distress last.  It seems that each other time I dropped a dose it only lasted a few days and this time seems to be a little worse.  Is 10 days tthe usual time it takes to adjust to a reduced dose.  If this is the case I def. went too fast in dropping the daily 1/4 tab since it was only about 6 days after the previous dose.

 

When one does make a step too fast as I have is it better to go back and start again or tough it out?

 

My doc told me to stop the lorazapam and switch to valium without a slow crossover so I did not do it.  If I were can somebody help with a plan for that?

 

The mornings are really tough, I wake up around 5 AM and seem to have a rebound effect as i am really anxious and hmy heat is racing and that is when I have the brunt of the GI distress.  I take my PM dose at around 8 or 9 PM.

 

For some folks the lower they get, the more they suffer.  This is a normal part of this process.  If you feel strongly about going back up in your dose and tapering slower then by all means do it.  It won't hurt you to continue your taper from here though.  Hard to say how long the GI distress will last, it's all part of the process. 

 

I really don't see the point of crossing to Valium at this point.  Some find it difficult to do and it comes with it's own set of problems.  You're so close to being off, it doesn't make sense to me.  It's up to you though and we can help you make a plan. 

 

I wanted you to see this about morning anxiety, it might help you understand better what's happening. 

 

Understanding Early Morning Anxiety

By Deanne Repich

           

Are mornings the worst time for your anxiety? When the alarm clock rings do you experience a feeling of dread? Do the symptoms kick in, making you tempted to roll over and snooze for hours so you don't have to face the day?

 

One reason why anxiety can be worse in the morning is that waking up is a sharp contrast to the sleep environment, which is perceived as pleasant for most people.

 

Picture this: You're sleeping peacefully in your warm, cozy bed, (for some, after many hours of insomnia). You are at peace, finally getting a break from the cares and tasks of the day. Then, BOOM! Suddenly, the shrill sound of your alarm clock jerks you awake. It triggers the "fight or flight" response, our body's inborn self-protective mechanism. And to top it off, the room is cold and dark. The dreaded worries and symptoms kick in.

 

There are several things you can do to make your "waking up" environment more pleasant. For example, get a radio alarm clock that wakes you up to your favorite music. Another alternative is an alarm clock that wakes you up gradually with pleasant chimes of increasing volume and frequency.

 

Keep a robe and slippers next to the bed so that you can warm up quickly and minimize a drop in body temperature as you get out of bed. If the bright lights of the room bother you, install a dimmer switch near your bed. You can gradually increase the light's intensity over a period of several minutes after you awaken.

 

Another reason why symptoms can be worse in the morning is because your blood sugar is low when you first wake up. You have gone all night without food. It's important to maintain a constant blood sugar level because the brain uses glucose as its fuel. If blood sugar levels are too low or drop too fast, then the brain starts running out of fuel. This causes the brain to trigger the "fight or flight" response.

 

The "fight or flight" response sends a rush of adrenaline, cortisol, and other neurotransmitters through your body to prepare you to fight or flee the perceived threat (low fuel). This process can trigger physical reactions ("symptoms") such as trembling, rapid heartbeat, sweating, panic attacks, fatigue, insomnia, mental confusion, nervousness, dizziness, and more.

 

To balance your blood sugar levels and minimize symptoms, keep a snack that contains "good" complex carbohydrates and protein by your bed. Eat it when you first wake up. You will likely notice that your symptoms improve shortly after eating the snack. You might try a combination of whole grain crackers and a handful of nuts, or a high-protein granola bar with some whole-wheat pretzels. The "good" carbohydrates will give you energy, and the protein will help to keep your blood sugar level steady over time.

 

Finally, dead-end thoughts play a huge role in creating early morning anxiety, as well as anxiety at any other time of day. Once you learn to overcome dead-end thoughts, you stop the anxiety cycle in its tracks.

 

Dead-end thoughts are negative, anxious, obsessive, or racing thoughts, that do not promote your well-being. They are based on faulty thinking patterns. These thoughts of helplessness, negativity, or anxious predictions about the future, give away your personal power and create the anxiety cycle. Here are a few examples of dead-end thoughts:

 

    * "I can't get out of bed feeling like this."

    * "Why do I feel this way? There must be something really wrong with me!"

    * "Everything is going to go wrong at the work meeting."

    * "It's a horrible day."

    * "When will this ever stop!"

 

The most important thing you can do to conquer early morning anxiety is to change how you PERCEIVE waking up. Change the dead-end thoughts that create the anxiety. Remember, physical symptoms by themselves are not anxiety. Negative perceptions are what create and perpetuate the anxiety cycle.

 

Choose to perceive waking up as a positive event - yes, you have a choice! Habitual dead-end thoughts can be unlearned and replaced with healthier self-talk. Of course, like any new skill you learn, it requires practice and patient persistence on your part to make healthier thoughts automatic.

 

Change your perception by creating a morning ritual that replaces the dead-end thoughts with healthier ones. Create a sequence of positive steps you can take when you first wake up to conquer early morning anxiety.

 

Positive rituals are helpful because they get you fully involved in the present moment (instead of the future), by focusing on one task at one time. Make the ritual automatic by taking the same steps every day in the same sequence. Here is an example of an anxiety-busting morning ritual. Use the ideas in this ritual as a starting off point to help you create your own personalized morning ritual.

 

    * Step 1: As you get ready for bed at night, place your alarm clock out of arm's reach from the bed. This action will motivate you to get out of bed to turn off the alarm when it rings the following morning.

 

      When the alarm rings, get out of bed immediately. Turn off the alarm and put on the robe next to your bed. As you do so, say aloud three times in an enthusiastic, cheery voice: "I am SO glad to be alive! What a WONDERFUL day!" Make sure to smile as you do this.

 

    * Step 2: Mentally and physically "check in" with the present moment. Accept any physical sensations without placing a negative judgment on them. Simply observe. Touch your face, hands, and legs a few times and observe the sensations. Focus intently on a few items in the room for several seconds. These simple activities help you to switch your focus from the future back to the present moment.

 

      If dead-end thoughts occur at this time (which they likely will), immediately replace them with healthier thoughts. It often helps to say the positive thoughts aloud. For example, if you're thinking: "I can't get out of bed feeling like this," replace it with: "These physical sensations might be uncomfortable, yet I know they are harmless. I am completely safe. I am physically able to get out of bed and have a great day. Watch. I can get out of bed just fine!" Then DO it!

 

    * Step 3: Turn on your favorite upbeat music CD. (Keep a CD player in your bedroom.) Sing along and dance for a minute or two.

 

    * Step 4: Eat the snack on your bedside table to help level your blood sugar.

 

    * Step 5: Take a shower and dress. Then continue with your day.

 

Once you find a pattern that works for you, use the same morning ritual -- the same steps in the same sequence -- every day. Repetition helps you to effectively unlearn old thoughts and behaviors and make the new ones automatic

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My GI distress lasted four weeks. And definitely during a drop in dose.  Try DLG (degylcerized licorace)

 

I don't feel comfortable suggesting what to do with the dose. If you drop too quickly you may have to updose just to stabilize. Perhaps someone can comment on this?

 

Yes, my mornings brought me to my knees - the tremors and nausea made me want to die. Hang in there though. It gets better. I'm living proof. Still deal with anxiety relapse but nausea has gone (finally!!!) away

 

Anna

 

How long should the GI distress last.  It seems that each other time I dropped a dose it only lasted a few days and this time seems to be a little worse.  Is 10 days tthe usual time it takes to adjust to a reduced dose.  If this is the case I def. went too fast in dropping the daily 1/4 tab since it was only about 6 days after the previous dose.

 

When one does make a step too fast as I have is it better to go back and start again or tough it out?

 

My doc told me to stop the lorazapam and switch to valium without a slow crossover so I did not do it.  If I were can somebody help with a plan for that?

 

The mornings are really tough, I wake up around 5 AM and seem to have a rebound effect as i am really anxious and hmy heat is racing and that is when I have the brunt of the GI distress.  I take my PM dose at around 8 or 9 PM.

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What are the main GI symptoms one can expect?

 

I am still at 0.125 at night.  I am sleeping a decent amount and only waking up a few times through the night.

 

I still have severe dry mouth especially in the back front and bottom teeth.  My right eye now twitches occasionally when I blow my nose or sneeze.  Not too often and not as often as my left eye.  Also, eye floaters are still around in intesity and duration.  Elevated anxiety, yup that too and occasional sore throat cold like symptoms.

 

Is all this normal.

 

I plan to do 0.125 for another week then do a titration which i will need some help with figuring out amount and schedule.

 

Has anybody tried 5-HTP to help with anxiety and withdrawal issues?

 

Thanks for all your halp and responses.

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Here is a list of many w/d symptoms one may have while tapering and post benzo freedom....

 

BENZODIAZEPINE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

 

PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS

      Excitability (jumpiness, restlessness)

      Insomnia, nightmares, other sleep disturbances

      Increased anxiety, panic attacks

      Agoraphobia, social phobia

      Perceptual distortions

      Depersonalisation, derealisation

      Hallucinations, misperceptions

      Depression

      Obsessions

      Paranoid thoughts

      Rage, aggression, irritability

      Poor memory and concentration

      Intrusive memories

      Craving (rare)

 

PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS

      Headache

      Pain/stiffness - (limbs, back, neck, teeth, jaw)

      Tingling, numbness, altered sensation - (limbs, face, trunk)

      Weakness ("jelly-legs")

      Fatigue, influenza-like symptoms

      Muscle twitches, jerks, tics, "electric shocks"

      Tremor

      Dizziness, light-headedness, poor balance

      Blurred/double vision, sore or dry eyes

      Tinnitus

      Hypersensitivity - (light, sound, touch, taste, smell)

      Gastrointestinal symptoms - (nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea,

      constipation, pain, distension, difficulty swallowing)

      Appetite/weight change

      Dry mouth, metallic taste, unusual smell

      Flushing/sweating/palpitations

      Overbreathing

      Urinary difficulties/menstrual difficulties

      Skin rashes, itching

      Fits (rare)

 

I plan to do 0.125 for another week then do a titration which i will need some help with figuring out amount and schedule.

 

When you are ready for a titration schedule, go to the Titration Taper Board. You might want to read the sticky'd posts first before posting your request.

Has anybody tried 5-HTP to help with anxiety and withdrawal issues?

 

You might want to try doing a forum search by clicking "forum" at the top of the page and then typing "5-HTP" in the search box, there are quite a few posts to scan through.  :thumbsup:

 

 

 

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hi rockstar , jumping in to lend my support and tell you some of the symptoms you are experiencing are similar to mine ,  severe dry mouth for one.

I too was on the benzo's for a short time, april 12th to June 2 nd when tried to cut by 50 % in weeks,  big mistake,  huge wd's . 

stabilized for 4 weeks, back at 1mg then titrated off at 10% per week for 10 weeks. 

I quit haveing most of my symptoms when I was into 4 th week of titration at .6 mg of clonazopam.

Same could happen to you , at one point or another.

 

You are also coming off of lorazopam, which has a rather short half life, so the drug is leaving your body like a surfing wave, instead of like clonazopam or valium which have significantly longer half lives.  The longer the half life the more drug is still present for your brain to feed off of so you get the rolling wave effect vs the surf wave up and down quickly. 

You can still do it directly off the lorazopam.  but you should definitely consider titration, and split your dose equally into at least 2 parts if not 3 to help control the wave effect.

Either way you have come to the right place for help.  many have come before you , and many will after.

St.

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Thanks for the reply.

 

Can you tell me what other side effects you experience that were similiar to mine?

 

I am at 0.125 right now and plan to split that into two doses, one in AM and one in PM, do that for a week or two and then go to only PM for week or two and then off.

 

Does that sound like a good plan?

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Thanks for the reply.

 

Can you tell me what other side effects you experience that were similiar to mine?

 

I am at 0.125 right now and plan to split that into two doses, one in AM and one in PM, do that for a week or two and then go to only PM for week or two and then off.

 

Does that sound like a good plan?

 

Are you experiencing withdrawal symptoms during the day? You are currently only taking it at night? Why do you want to split it up now? If you are not having difficulties in the day time, you may just want to cut down the pm dose in half, wait one to two weeks and then drop the last amount (.0625mg).

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I am experiencing withdrawal symptoms during the day.  The were the worst during the first week and now that I am in week two, they are still there but better.

 

Yes, I only take it at night.

 

Your idea sounds good and I am not sure the best way to go here.  If you think that just spliting the PM dose in half is a good step then I will tey that.  I only mentioned splitting because another post in this thread mentioned that may be a good next step to avoid the daytime issue and also the interdose effects.

 

Whatever gets me off the stuff with minimal withdrawal and long term side effects is the way I would like to go. 

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rock , ultimately  you will have to decide if the daytime symptoms are bad enough that you want to split your dose.  As I mentioned, I was coming off clonozopam and opted to split my dose in half and take one half at night and 1/2 in daytime.  clono has a longer half life than lorazopam, so its possible if only taking it at night you are experiencing dosage withdrawl during the day  , which could be helped, if you split the dose. 

Like Theresa indicated though , if the symptoms are bearable,  you can opt to stick with just the nighttime dose and reduce as you indicated from there.  it really is a trial and error process and is unique to each person.  If you have no problems at all sleeping , then splitting the dose is worth a try in my opinion.  If it doesn't work you can always go back.  Remember , the end goal of this game is to get off the junk, but unlike a race , there is no prize for the one that finishes first.  Finishing  is gonna get you the same prize,  all your emotions and sense of well being back.

st

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Well, I have made it down to .0625 in the PM.  The first 3 days I felt fine, better even, and a little more myself.  However, last night on day four I felt worse.  Had a hard time sleeping and heart felt like it was racing and the GI issues came back.  Is it normal to good the first few days after a dose reduction and then feel bad for a few days after?  I want to just stick it out and stay at this dose for a week or two and then hop off.

 

Thanks for any and all replies.

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What you're feeling is absolutely normal, hang in there!  You're doing an amazing job of getting rid of this stuff.  I've heard the cuts typically hit on the third day, so you're right in line with that.  Keep going, I'm so excited for you.  Hey, you'll let us know when you're done won't you?  We love celebrations around here and being benzo free is the best one ever.

 

You rock, rockstar!!

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Thanks so much.  Do you think that .06 is a good jumping point or should I consider .03?  Thanks for all the support.

 

Totally up to you, I've seen people jump off at .01 and up!  You're done such a great job so far, you must know what you're doing, I say you'll know when it's time.

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