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Positive Affirmations--scientific evidence?


[Ma...]

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Used to think this was all hocus pocus weirdness, but my therapist and several others have told me about scientific research that confirms what positive self-talk and focus does to help us heal.

 

Can anyone point me to more info on this?

 

My therapist did tell me that it definitely changes the brain (because it did for him when he was going through horrid depression) and that in the affirmation, you never use a negative "hot button" word because the brain will only pick up on that word and reinforce it.  So you don't say "My depression isn't as bad today," because it will just focus on "depression" instead you say "I am feeling very light, bright and positive today" and it will focus on "light, bright and positive".

 

Anyway, love you guys, going to stay light and bright and positive myself!

 

Mary

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I don't have any research links to back it up but I've read the same thing, Mary, including the instruction to always put the affirmation in positive terms.  You may find some in the book "What to Say When You Talk to Yourself".  That was the first book I read where I understood that it didn't matter if you believed what you said to yourself or if it was "true", the brain accepts it anyway.  Of course, that also works for negative self-talk which is why we have to be aware of guard against the negative self-talk.  
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Perseverance has been posting about this.....Here is one she likes.....http://www.imadulation.com/guided-imagery-healing-surgery.htm

 

I would love to hear more about this too......The Benzo Wise Book addresses this quite a bit too....It was essential in her recovery...

 

Pam

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I've found this...http://www.naturalnews.com/028399_gratitude_self_healing.html

 

and am reading Dr. Caroline Leaf's book "Who Switched Off My Brain" who explains what happens in your brain when you think healthy postive thoughts vs. unhealthy, toxic ones!

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's a bit more abstract and doesn't involve some sort of esoteric explanation, but- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoneuroimmunology

 

I find it incredibly hard to think positive whilst in the clutches of hardcore insomnia. I still think it is very important, and am trying my best to affirm positive things about myself. Most the time it feels very disingenuous and artificial :'( :'( :'(

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I read it the book The Secret something about that inner talk. How we have to say what we want instead of what we don't want. For example: we say 'I don't want to feel anxious'- our brain pick up that word anxious and sometimes don't recognize word don't. So we have to say 'I want to feel good, positive, great, relaxed...'some positive words.

It need practise but it is worth. Try to analyse your inner talk especially when you feel anxious. What do you say to yourself to feel anxious, sometimes is good to write on paper cause you feel confused when you are anxious, and latter when you calmed down try to change that negative inner talk which leads you to be anxious to some positive (and opposite of what you were saying to yourself while you were anxious).

'I feel dizzy and I will faint'----'I feel a little uncomfortable but that is just cause I am tired, it will go away soon' something like that

 

Hope this wasn't very confusing how I said  :).

 

Marija

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Thanks Marry...great stuff!

 

Ben...even if you don't feel it, your brain picks up on it anyway...so I've read...that's what I'm doing...don't believe it but I say it anyway!

 

Love ya both

Mary

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  • 8 months later...
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