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What’s something positive you’ve taken from this experience?


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I was responding to another post about creativity when it hit me that wd has improved my storytelling abilities. I’ve always enjoyed writing, but seldom felt the inspiration to map out a whole story from beginning to end and put it out in the world. Now I’m bursting with fully realized ideas and am working toward supporting myself with screenwriting. I can attribute this to a lot of things: having to relearn being creative, the ability to stand back from my thought and feelings into pure awareness, and just the sheer DEPTH of the wd experience has matured me as a human. I’m far from saying I’m grateful for the experience, but I will recognize that I’ve taken something powerful from it.

 

What about y’all? Have you gained an insight, skill, direction, etc. from the process?

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I'm glad to hear your creativity is blossoming CharlieWaltz and you bring up a good point - there are huge rewards to being benzo-free.  My creativity has manifested itself in my crochet and cooking and I am enjoying both (and hubby is really enjoying the cooking  :-)  But the bigger gain for me is the confidence and self-esteem I now have.  Both of those were in the gutter but today I can honestly say I feel reasonably good about my life and myself.
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Great post Charlie Waltz! Keep your juices flowing.  Creativity is a wonderful thing and I love writing and reading.

 

I'm like Kate and feel my confidence slowly coming back. I'm also good at word puzzles and focusing on books, etc. again.  Now if I could just get some athleticism back... :laugh: But I'm grateful for the improvements I've seen. Thanks for bringing this up. 

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I have gain a greater sense of empathy.  Before this experience I had no idea how much suffering one person could be faced with.  Made me realize that although I suffered greatly, many ppl suffer along with a terminal prognosis to boot.  Many people suffer emotional and physical pain day after day.  I am indeed grateful that I finally uncovered what was wrong and was able to recover.

 

I may never be exactly the same person again, but how could any of us be after this experience?

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THE only good thing that came out of my wd......

No more anxiety. Like living with what I did was so far past  the brink it just obliterated it. It doesn't exist anymore.

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Great topic.  I had to think about it for awhile. 

I think a very good take for me, was that the cruelty of withdrawal made me get tough about self care.  It made me learn to say no when I meant no, and I've learned a new healthier way to put my self love first. 

My benzo use allowed me to make poorer decisions by blunting out the emotional pain of my choices.  Now I am learning to take my energy limits seriously.    No more little yellow or pink pills!!!  Just me being real(er) with myself.    It's something  I needed to learn my whole life.

 

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THE only good thing that came out of my wd......

No more anxiety. Like living with what I did was so far past  the brink it just obliterated it. It doesn't exist anymore.

 

really love this southernbelle

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As a counselor by profession, I thought I had empathy before, but this is on a whole new level now, and I've literally used every clinical skill I teach to survive this!

 

I have a deeper awareness of self and what I can handle (my gawd we all just survived something...). The spiritual part of me has deepened. I see my life more clearly now, and many of the things that used ti rile me just don't even matter anymore. As corny as this sounds it almost feels like I'm reborn.  Like I'm still feeling a bit shaken bc I know I'm not completely "out of the woods" yet, but I see life and opportunity again  - and its def not taken for granted. This whole experience definitely knocks any superficiality out of oneself!

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1) empathy

2) not taking for granted simple things like being able to sit and be and feel calm. 

3) I think once this is over I'll be better able to deal with other forms of suffering. Which, in my opinion, if they don't involve crushing insomnia or akathesia won't be that bad.

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I became good at Meditation and learn to look at life in different way, in easier way....more spiritual and be kinder with myself and people and more forgiveness....these sicknesses all came for a reason to change something we were not doing right, we need to get the message and change our manner to improve and become a better human being
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I learned patience. I've always been an impatient person, but this benzo journey has taught me that things happen when they happen and getting my knickers in a twist will not help things happen faster. I've tried to take this lesson into other areas of my life.

 

Katz

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1) empathy

2) not taking for granted simple things like being able to sit and be and feel calm. 

3) I think once this is over I'll be better able to deal with other forms of suffering. Which, in my opinion, if they don't involve crushing insomnia or akathesia won't be that bad.

 

Well said AD

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Another positive thing: an even greater appreciate for Tom Petty's The Waiting.  I always loved that song, but even more so now, when I can even listen to it.
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