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Why It's Worth Questioning the Widespread Use of Psychiatric Medication


[Ms...]

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I once had a counseling client come to me because he was experiencing insomnia after his car skidded off of the highway. He was not injured in the accident but he could have died as another car nearly hit his vehicle at high speed. Before coming to me he went to his family doctor who, after hearing his story, prescribed him an antidepressant. When he became more anxious after taking this medication, he was then given a benzodiazepine, a class of drug known to quickly cause physical dependence as well as dreadful withdrawal symptoms (and that can often result in a worsening of the very symptoms the medication is supposedly meant to treat). A month later, his anxiety worsened and he was prescribed a third medication, a mood stabilizer. Next, he was given an antipsychotic.

 

https://themighty.com/2020/03/widespread-use-psychiatric-medication-safer-options/

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All of this stems from the fact that doctors seem to come out of med school with a set of blinders on that makes them incapable of understanding that the drugs they are prescribing can exacerbate the problem. If doctors recognized that it is possible (if not likely) that a benzo or an AD can make the condition worse they would know better than to add antipsychotics or mood stabilizers on top of that. The fact that it is common practice to prescribe multiple drugs in an attempt to find some random combination that "works" is criminal.

 

We are nothing more than rats in a giant science experiment that no one is concerned with learning anything from.

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All of this stems from the fact that doctors seem to come out of med school with a set of blinders on that makes them incapable of understanding that the drugs they are prescribing can exacerbate the problem. If doctors recognized that it is possible (if not likely) that a benzo or an AD can make the condition worse they would know better than to add antipsychotics or mood stabilizers on top of that. The fact that it is common practice to prescribe multiple drugs in an attempt to find some random combination that "works" is criminal.

 

We are nothing more than rats in a giant science experiment that no one is concerned with learning anything from.

 

It's wild what I thought psychiatry was when I was a patient compared with what it actually is. I thought all the things they said were figured out, not pharma marketing terms or (often disproven) hypothesis.

 

I just found another article in psychiatric times I thought was interesting:

 

https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/qas/impoverishment-psychiatric-knowledge

 

Regrettably, psychiatrists, unlike all other specialists, have been taught to consider comorbidity only in terms of diagnoses, and not as problems and treatment experiences. And they are unable to think “iatrogenic” in interpreting clinical problems, simply because they have not been exposed to the concept, which has been submitted to tight censorship by mainstream psychiatry.

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It's wild what I thought psychiatry was when I was a patient compared with what it actually is. I thought all the things they said were figured out, not pharma marketing terms or (often disproven) hypothesis.

 

I was still pretty naive for awhile after coming off the drugs, even after I could see firsthand what they did to me. It wasn't until I started looking into the mechanics behind the entire system that I started to realize the extent of the problem. Once you understand the approval process for drugs, how doctors are educated and just how the system works in general it is pretty frightening. It also makes perfect sense how all of this can happen.

 

That's why I always say that we absolutely cannot take anything for granted when it comes to our health. If there is one drug that can make you incredibly ill while the medical community denies it, how many other drugs can do the same thing?

 

This also lead me down the diet rabbit hole. I had no idea that most of our dietary guidelines aren't based upon solid science. Ever since they started telling us how to eat half a century ago we have gotten fatter and sicker. The drug and diet thing are two sides of the same coin.

 

It would be nice to believe that we are beyond the days of having to watch our backs all of the time. Most of us no longer have to worry about being eaten by lions but that doesn't mean that everything is completely safe. The scary thing is that we are conditioned not to ask too many questions, to just rely on what we are told by so called "authorities".

 

Just wish I would have realized this 30 years ago.

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I wonder if this railroad engineer was "on drugs" or maybe should have been "on drugs"?

 

https://apnews.com/22cfbc4806c0befc7d8623c0bfa0cc53

 

"Feds: Man intentionally derailed LA train near hospital ship (USNS Mercy)

By CHRISTOPHER WEBER

24 minutes ago

 

"LOS ANGELES (AP) — A train engineer intentionally drove a speeding locomotive off a track at the Port of Los Angeles because he was suspicious about the presence of a Navy hospital ship docked there to help during the coronovirus crisis, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

 

The locomotive crashed through a series of barriers and fences before coming to rest more than 250 yards (230 meters) from the U.S. Navy Hospital Ship Mercy on Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a release.

 

Nobody was hurt.

 

Eduardo Moreno, 44, was charged with one count of train wrecking, prosecutors said. It wasn’t immediately known if he has an attorney.

Moreno acknowledged in two separate interviews with law enforcement that he intentionally derailed and crashed the train near the Mercy, according to the criminal complaint.

 

“You only get this chance once. The whole world is watching. I had to,” Moreno told investigators, according to the complaint. “People don’t know what’s going on here. Now they will.”

 

Moreno said he was suspicious of the Mercy and believed it had an alternate purpose related to COVID-19 or a government takeover, an affidavit states. Moreno stated that he acted alone and had not pre-planned the attempted attack.

 

In an interview with FBI agents, Moreno stated that “he did it out of the desire to ‘wake people up,’” according to an affidavit.

 

“Moreno stated that he thought that the USNS Mercy was suspicious and did not believe ‘the ship is what they say it’s for,’” the complaint said.

 

The Mercy arrived in port this week to provide a thousand hospital beds for non-coronavirus cases to take the load of regional medical centers expecting a surge of COVID-19 patients.

 

Phillip Sanfield, spokesman for the Port of Los Angeles, said the locomotive never came close to the Mercy.

 

“It would have had to have gone several hundred yards through a parking lot and cross a water channel to reach the ship,” Sanfield said. “ The tracks are nowhere near the Mercy.”

 

The engineer wasn’t a port employee but apparently was working for Pacific Harbor Line Inc., a train company that handles cargo in the port and connects to major railroad lines, Sanfield said. The company didn’t immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

 

A small fuel leak was quickly controlled and port operations weren’t seriously affected, Sanfield said.

 

Moreno was arrested by a California Highway Patrol officer who witnessed the crash and captured him as he fled the scene. The FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force and the Port of Los Angeles Police are now leading the investigation.

 

The CHP officer reported seeing “the train smash into a concrete barrier at the end of the track, smash into a steel barrier, smash into a chain-link fence, slide through a parking lot, slide across another lot filled with gravel, and smash into a second chain-link fence,” according to an affadavit."

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I wonder if this railroad engineer was "on drugs" or maybe should have been "on drugs"?

 

Or maybe he was eating a horrible diet, sitting behind a desk all day, spending too much time on social media and getting zero exercise which lead to a downward spiral of mental issues.

 

If psych drugs were truly "medicine" then certainly we would have seen the incidence of mental illness drop since we started medicating people, but we have actually seen exactly the opposite- the more meds we give the more mental illness we see.

 

Everyone wants a quick, easy fix but that's not how it works. You think you can monkey with brain chemistry by hacking the CNS by introducing poorly understood synthetic psychoactive drugs?

 

Good luck with that.

 

 

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One thing for certain, he wasn't sitting behind a desk all day. He was a train engineer at the busiest sea port in the United States and purposefully drove a locomotive at high speed toward the USNS Mercy. He obviously is suffering from mental illness. It could be caused by most anything. It's under investigation & some sort of explanation will be provided for the public.
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