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Agitation, Impatience


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Hi all

Off Klon now for 11mo, last rescue dose was 6mo ago, so benzo free for 6mo after daily .25 use for 4.5yrs

 

 

I have been experiencing something like this for quite some time

 

Story

 

Im in line waiting to pay for something, Im uncomfortable, fidgety, dizzy, agitated and cant wait to get outa the line, its not like panic, but a form of agitation or something

 

its not only when "in line" but talking to people, interacting I get these feelings,,

 

I have this form of feeling uncomfortable and edgy

 

I was never like this, was wondering if anyone can relate to these type of feelings

TY all

xo

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Just a suggestion- may be having adrenalin bursts due to the challenge of restarting work. Doing any activity that requires concentration, interactions with others, lots of auditory/visual simulation can cause small stress situations all day that normally you could handle, but due to the lack of modulation, tip the scales too far. This pushes the adrenals which have usually had a pretty good whipping during WD. The "stepping on the gas pedal" would lead to extra fatigue.

 

Vitamin C supports adrenal glands, and can help anxiety/fatigue. Need to use a buffered form, Ester C, or liposomal to avoid any potential tummy issues. Some people have sensitivities to some forms so there might be need to try different ones.  1000mg/dose seems to be average.

 

Good news is that it won't harm you and helps the immune system fight off viruses. Both positives. This is additional info- everyone makes their own choices. Hope it helps.

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I have this as well. In line, driving, waiting for ANYTHING! And if someone starts talking to me at work or anywhere else I find myself wanting to hurry and get away from the situation because I feel so agitated and irritated that I think I’m gonna flip out on them. I just lost a relationship a couple days ago probably the best one of my life because of my absolute irritation and flying off the handle at this person.
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Vitamin C supports adrenal glands, and can help anxiety/fatigue. Need to use a buffered form, Ester C, or liposomal to avoid any potential tummy issues. Some people have sensitivities to some forms so there might be need to try different ones.  1000mg/dose seems to be average.

 

 

No, Vitamin C does not support the adrenal.

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Yes, I too can relate. It helps if I can remember in the moment that this is not me but it the Benzo Beast. Then I try to just talk myself calm and try to do what I know is normal behavior and avoid speaking if possible until the feeling passes.
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As usual, same author states," vitamin C doesn't help adrenals." Evidently never reads any of the scientific studies.

 

              "The study tested the effects of vitamin C on the adrenal function of laboratory animals subjected to stress, said P. Samuel Campbell, Ph.D., chairman of the university's department of biological sciences. In both animals and humans, the adrenal gland reacts to stress by releasing corticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol. These and other hormones trigger the "fight or flight" reaction that allows us to spring into action when in danger. They also suppress the immune system, the body's first line of defense against disease.

 

      The Alabama researchers put laboratory rats under stress by immobilizing them for one hour a day over a three-week period. To check whether vitamin C would reduce the production of stress hormones, the rats were fed 200 milligrams a day, the equivalent of several grams a day for humans. This dosage far exceeds the present recommended daily allowance (RDA) of 60 milligrams, a figure based on the amount required to prevent deficiency diseases such as scurvy. The study showed that vitamin C reduced the levels of stress hormones in the blood-and also reduced other typical indicators of physical and emotional stress, such as loss in body weight, enlargement of the adrenal glands, and reduction in the size of the thymus gland and the spleen, according to Campbell.

 

        In addition, the vitamin C treatment elevated the levels of circulating IgG antibody, the body's principal defense against systemic infection, he said.

 

        In the control group-rats who were not subjected to stress-vitamin C increased the production of IgG antibody to a somewhat higher level than it did in the stressed rats. This suggests that stress may create a tolerance for vitamin C. Consequently, animals-and perhaps people-who are under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990823072615.htm

 

Please note last sentence: "If under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function." A good idea for everyone at this time.

 

American Journal Clinical Nutrition 2007

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

Sebastian J Padayatty  1 , John L Doppman, Richard Chang, Yaohui Wang, John Gill, Dimitris A Papanicolaou, Mark Levine      PMID: 17616774  DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/86.1.145

 

Conclusions: Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulation increases adrenal vein but not peripheral vein vitamin C concentrations. These data are the first in humans showing that hormone-regulated vitamin secretion occurs and that adrenal vitamin C paracrine secretion is part of the stress response. Tight control of peripheral vitamin C concentration is permissive of higher local concentrations that may have paracrine functions.

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As usual, same author states," vitamin C doesn't help adrenals." Evidently never reads any of the scientific studies.

 

              "The study tested the effects of vitamin C on the adrenal function of laboratory animals subjected to stress, said P. Samuel Campbell, Ph.D., chairman of the university's department of biological sciences. In both animals and humans, the adrenal gland reacts to stress by releasing corticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol. These and other hormones trigger the "fight or flight" reaction that allows us to spring into action when in danger. They also suppress the immune system, the body's first line of defense against disease.

 

      The Alabama researchers put laboratory rats under stress by immobilizing them for one hour a day over a three-week period. To check whether vitamin C would reduce the production of stress hormones, the rats were fed 200 milligrams a day, the equivalent of several grams a day for humans. This dosage far exceeds the present recommended daily allowance (RDA) of 60 milligrams, a figure based on the amount required to prevent deficiency diseases such as scurvy. The study showed that vitamin C reduced the levels of stress hormones in the blood-and also reduced other typical indicators of physical and emotional stress, such as loss in body weight, enlargement of the adrenal glands, and reduction in the size of the thymus gland and the spleen, according to Campbell.

 

        In addition, the vitamin C treatment elevated the levels of circulating IgG antibody, the body's principal defense against systemic infection, he said.

 

        In the control group-rats who were not subjected to stress-vitamin C increased the production of IgG antibody to a somewhat higher level than it did in the stressed rats. This suggests that stress may create a tolerance for vitamin C. Consequently, animals-and perhaps people-who are under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990823072615.htm

 

Please note last sentence: "If under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function." A good idea for everyone at this time.

 

American Journal Clinical Nutrition 2007

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

Sebastian J Padayatty  1 , John L Doppman, Richard Chang, Yaohui Wang, John Gill, Dimitris A Papanicolaou, Mark Levine      PMID: 17616774  DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/86.1.145

 

Conclusions: Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulation increases adrenal vein but not peripheral vein vitamin C concentrations. These data are the first in humans showing that hormone-regulated vitamin secretion occurs and that adrenal vitamin C paracrine secretion is part of the stress response. Tight control of peripheral vitamin C concentration is permissive of higher local concentrations that may have paracrine functions.

 

Good hhot, now you can treat depressed rats.

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As usual, same author states," vitamin C doesn't help adrenals." Evidently never reads any of the scientific studies.

 

              "The study tested the effects of vitamin C on the adrenal function of laboratory animals subjected to stress, said P. Samuel Campbell, Ph.D., chairman of the university's department of biological sciences. In both animals and humans, the adrenal gland reacts to stress by releasing corticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol. These and other hormones trigger the "fight or flight" reaction that allows us to spring into action when in danger. They also suppress the immune system, the body's first line of defense against disease.

 

      The Alabama researchers put laboratory rats under stress by immobilizing them for one hour a day over a three-week period. To check whether vitamin C would reduce the production of stress hormones, the rats were fed 200 milligrams a day, the equivalent of several grams a day for humans. This dosage far exceeds the present recommended daily allowance (RDA) of 60 milligrams, a figure based on the amount required to prevent deficiency diseases such as scurvy. The study showed that vitamin C reduced the levels of stress hormones in the blood-and also reduced other typical indicators of physical and emotional stress, such as loss in body weight, enlargement of the adrenal glands, and reduction in the size of the thymus gland and the spleen, according to Campbell.

 

        In addition, the vitamin C treatment elevated the levels of circulating IgG antibody, the body's principal defense against systemic infection, he said.

 

        In the control group-rats who were not subjected to stress-vitamin C increased the production of IgG antibody to a somewhat higher level than it did in the stressed rats. This suggests that stress may create a tolerance for vitamin C. Consequently, animals-and perhaps people-who are under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990823072615.htm

 

Please note last sentence: "If under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function." A good idea for everyone at this time.

 

American Journal Clinical Nutrition 2007

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

Sebastian J Padayatty  1 , John L Doppman, Richard Chang, Yaohui Wang, John Gill, Dimitris A Papanicolaou, Mark Levine      PMID: 17616774  DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/86.1.145

 

Conclusions: Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulation increases adrenal vein but not peripheral vein vitamin C concentrations. These data are the first in humans showing that hormone-regulated vitamin secretion occurs and that adrenal vitamin C paracrine secretion is part of the stress response. Tight control of peripheral vitamin C concentration is permissive of higher local concentrations that may have paracrine functions.

 

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

 

What does this have to do with Vit C suppressing cortisol? NOTHING.

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Okay, we're straying off topic now - let's focus on giving support to the OP.  Thanks

 

We strayed off topic in the 3rd response to the original post. I don't see why a topic can't develop organically.

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Hi Maugham1! I still remember the day in early 2019 when I was posting about trying to decide if I should jump off .001 mg of Klonopin and you posted a link like a rickroll to Van Halen's Jump--and I did. Thanks for the push. Good times.

 

thedaydreamer, yes I actually have two columns on my excel sheet titled "irritability" and anther titled "agitation". The way I describe the difference is that agitation is more like a whole body very physical over-stimulation and inability to relax. It goes along with my other symptoms of "anxiety" (different from fear/terror which usually shows without much physical symptoms) and terrible burning acid stinging biting mentholated dysesthesia/parasthesia. The way I would describe my irritability is it's more mental- like someone asks me a question and I wish they would "HURRY THE HECK UP and GO!" It's a pressure to escape/move/do/finish. They can both happen together or alone. They tend to also present with "inability to handle stress". I tend to get agitation much more than irritability. You have to see my excel sheet one day it's like a rainbow of colors on many columns. I'm still trying to find patterns but to this day it's still all chaotic non-linear hell with ups, downs, lack of progress, patial windows, and non-correlations of foods/exercise/supplements/sleep/sex/stress/weather/exposures to chemicals or mold or removal of amalgams etc.

 

Sorry you are suffering so much. I'm trusting God to do what he said he would do.

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Hi Maugham1! I still remember the day in early 2019 when I was posting about trying to decide if I should jump off .001 mg of Klonopin and you posted a link like a rickroll to Van Halen's Jump--and I did. Thanks for the push. Good times.

 

thedaydreamer, yes I actually have two columns on my excel sheet titled "irritability" and anther titled "agitation". The way I describe the difference is that agitation is more like a whole body very physical over-stimulation and inability to relax. It goes along with my other symptoms of "anxiety" (different from fear/terror which usually shows without much physical symptoms) and terrible burning acid stinging biting mentholated dysesthesia/parasthesia. The way I would describe my irritability is it's more mental- like someone asks me a question and I wish they would "HURRY THE HECK UP and GO!" It's a pressure to escape/move/do/finish. They can both happen together or alone. They tend to also present with "inability to handle stress". I tend to get agitation much more than irritability. You have to see my excel sheet one day it's like a rainbow of colors on many columns. I'm still trying to find patterns but to this day it's still all chaotic non-linear hell with ups, downs, lack of progress, patial windows, and non-correlations of foods/exercise/supplements/sleep/sex/stress/weather/exposures to chemicals or mold or removal of amalgams etc.

 

Sorry you are suffering so much. I'm trusting God to do what he said he would do.

 

Interesting post, TrustGod. I think the irritability for me is related to the agitation which comes back to akathisia, in my opinion. I constantly feel like I need to be moving to ward off the agitation. I can't just sit and enjoy things and relax anymore. It's going to be a tough existence until the agitation goes away permanently. I like what you said about the non-correlations of all those factors. I've not been able to find a single factor that seems to help or hurt me. I would say whenever something abruptly changes, I definitely get worse for a time period, and that's about it.

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As usual, same author states," vitamin C doesn't help adrenals." Evidently never reads any of the scientific studies.

 

              "The study tested the effects of vitamin C on the adrenal function of laboratory animals subjected to stress, said P. Samuel Campbell, Ph.D., chairman of the university's department of biological sciences. In both animals and humans, the adrenal gland reacts to stress by releasing corticoids, such as corticosterone and cortisol. These and other hormones trigger the "fight or flight" reaction that allows us to spring into action when in danger. They also suppress the immune system, the body's first line of defense against disease.

 

      The Alabama researchers put laboratory rats under stress by immobilizing them for one hour a day over a three-week period. To check whether vitamin C would reduce the production of stress hormones, the rats were fed 200 milligrams a day, the equivalent of several grams a day for humans. This dosage far exceeds the present recommended daily allowance (RDA) of 60 milligrams, a figure based on the amount required to prevent deficiency diseases such as scurvy. The study showed that vitamin C reduced the levels of stress hormones in the blood-and also reduced other typical indicators of physical and emotional stress, such as loss in body weight, enlargement of the adrenal glands, and reduction in the size of the thymus gland and the spleen, according to Campbell.

 

        In addition, the vitamin C treatment elevated the levels of circulating IgG antibody, the body's principal defense against systemic infection, he said.

 

        In the control group-rats who were not subjected to stress-vitamin C increased the production of IgG antibody to a somewhat higher level than it did in the stressed rats. This suggests that stress may create a tolerance for vitamin C. Consequently, animals-and perhaps people-who are under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990823072615.htm

 

Please note last sentence: "If under emotional stress may require higher doses of vitamin C to protect immune function." A good idea for everyone at this time.

 

American Journal Clinical Nutrition 2007

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

Sebastian J Padayatty  1 , John L Doppman, Richard Chang, Yaohui Wang, John Gill, Dimitris A Papanicolaou, Mark Levine      PMID: 17616774  DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/86.1.145

 

Conclusions: Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulation increases adrenal vein but not peripheral vein vitamin C concentrations. These data are the first in humans showing that hormone-regulated vitamin secretion occurs and that adrenal vitamin C paracrine secretion is part of the stress response. Tight control of peripheral vitamin C concentration is permissive of higher local concentrations that may have paracrine functions.

 

Human adrenal glands secrete vitamin C in response to adrenocorticotrophic hormone

 

What does this have to do with Vit C suppressing cortisol? NOTHING.

 

Vitamin C supplementation attenuates the increases in circulating cortisol, adrenaline and anti-inflammatory polypeptides following ultramarathon running

E M Peters et al. Int J Sports Med. 2001 Oct.

Show details

 

Full-text links

Cite

 

Abstract

The effects of vitamin C supplementation on the alterations in the circulating concentrations of cortisol, adrenaline, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) which accompany ultramarathon running were measured using immuno-chemiluminescence, radioimmunoassay and ELISA procedures. Forty-five participants in the 1999 Comrades 90 km marathon were divided into equal groups (n = 15) receiving 500 mg/day Vit C (VC-500), 1500 mg/day Vit C (VC-1500) or placebo (P) for 7 days before the race, on the day of the race, and for 2 days following completion. Runners recorded dietary intake before, during and after the race and provided 35 ml blood samples 15 - 18 hrs before the race, immediately post-race, 24 hrs post race and 48 hrs post-race. Twenty-nine runners (VC-1500, n = 12; VC-500, n = 10; P, n = 7) complied with all study requirements. All post-race concentrations were adjusted for plasma volume changes. Analyses of dietary intakes and blood glucose and anti-oxidant status on the day preceding the race and the day of the race did not reveal that carbohydrate intake or plasma vitamins E and A were significant confounders in the study. Mean pre-race concentrations of serum vitamin C in VC-500 and VC-1500 groups (128 +/- 31 and 153 +/- 34 micromol/l) were significantly higher than in the P group (83 +/- 39 micromol/l). Immediate post-race serum cortisol was significantly lower in the VC-1500 group (p < 0.05) than in P and VC-500 groups. When the data from VC-500 and P groups was combined (n = 17), immediate post-race plasma adrenaline, IL-10 and IL-1Ra concentrations were also significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the VC-1500 group. The study demonstrates an attenuation, albeit transient, of both the adrenal stress hormone and anti-inflammatory polypeptide response to prolonged exercise in runners who supplemented with 1500 mg vitamin C per day when compared to < or = 500 mg per day.

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Good stuff guys

 

If I can add to my original post,,,,,this "complex" that I am reffering to also has along with it in these situations when "in line" or whatever I start to feel myself not paying attention, getting dizzy and can feel my jaws, neck and head clenching up tensely with an utter inability to focus,,,again its not really panic per se, but this agitated state

 

its so hit or miss with this stuff, what one person can tolerate blows another apart

TDD

 

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I am almost 5 years off and for the last year I've been experiencing several irritability and agitation. I've gone down about every rabbit hole there is and cant figure it out. It's about to drive me insane. Definitely something chemical and something I can't control. If I spend time outside and completely wear myself out for a full day doing sports or fishing or anything to just wear me out. I'll feel better for a couple days. I've also got restless legs and arms, sweating, heart palpitations, and some other things going on. I'm very miserable. It's no way to live.
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I am almost 5 years off and for the last year I've been experiencing several irritability and agitation. I've gone down about every rabbit hole there is and cant figure it out. It's about to drive me insane. Definitely something chemical and something I can't control. If I spend time outside and completely wear myself out for a full day doing sports or fishing or anything to just wear me out. I'll feel better for a couple days. I've also got restless legs and arms, sweating, heart palpitations, and some other things going on. I'm very miserable. It's no way to live.

 

Are you still on other medications? Just curious.

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I am almost 5 years off and for the last year I've been experiencing several irritability and agitation. I've gone down about every rabbit hole there is and cant figure it out. It's about to drive me insane. Definitely something chemical and something I can't control. If I spend time outside and completely wear myself out for a full day doing sports or fishing or anything to just wear me out. I'll feel better for a couple days. I've also got restless legs and arms, sweating, heart palpitations, and some other things going on. I'm very miserable. It's no way to live.

 

Are you still on other medications? Just curious.

 

25 mg of trazadone. I stopped taking it for a month to see how things went and it stayed exactly the same. It's not from that.

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