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Changing from Valium pills to compounded liquid HELP!:)


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You may feel a need to updose slightly.  It kind of depends on how you take your pills.  If you let them sit in your mouth for a while, there can be some direct (sublingual) absorption which can increase the effective dose that you receive from the pill.  Some people literally suck on their pills. 

 

If you routinely swallow your pills quickly, the change to liquid probably won't be as noticeable.  You might still feel a need for a 5-10% updose.

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Hello, Amlsucks.  I don’t have experience with diazepam/Valium, but I do with clonazepam/Klonopin.  I switched from regular tablets to a compounded oral suspension. I had no issues. When I made the switch, I took the same dose I had been taking in tablet form in liquid form. I then held my dose constant to gauge my reaction. After I was confident all was well, I began reducing the dose.

 

Other practices I follow include ...

  • I ingest the suspension on an empty or nearly empty stomach.
  • I shake the suspension vigorously before I quickly measure out my dose. (If your bottle does not come with an adapter cap or “bung” ask your compounding pharmacist to provide one.)
  • After I ingest the suspension, I pour a small amount of distilled water into a glass jar.  I draw the water into the syringe then dispense it back into the jar.  I drink the rinse water.  I repeat this process 2-3 times. (Doing this avoids a possible issue with drug loss due to surface transfer - i.e., a small amount of drug adheres to the inside of the syringe.)

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Did you switch so that all of your daily dose is liquid? I did pills and liquid and didn't notice any problems. Now that I'm down to 1 mg, it's all liquid of course.
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You may feel a need to updose slightly.  It kind of depends on how you take your pills.  If you let them sit in your mouth for a while, there can be some direct (sublingual) absorption which can increase the effective dose that you receive from the pill.  Some people literally suck on their pills. 

 

If you routinely swallow your pills quickly, the change to liquid probably won't be as noticeable.  You might still feel a need for a 5-10% updose.

Thank you!

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Hello, Amlsucks.  I don’t have experience with diazepam/Valium, but I do with clonazepam/Klonopin.  I switched from regular tablets to a compounded oral suspension. I had no issues. When I made the switch, I took the same dose I had been taking in tablet form in liquid form. I then held my dose constant to gauge my reaction. After I was confident all was well, I began reducing the dose.

 

Other practices I follow include ...

  • I ingest the suspension on an empty or nearly empty stomach.
  • I shake the suspension vigorously before I quickly measure out my dose. (If your bottle does not come with an adapter cap or “bung” ask your compounding pharmacist to provide one.)
  • After I ingest the suspension, I pour a small amount of distilled water into a glass jar.  I draw the water into the syringe then dispense it back into the jar.  I drink the rinse water.  I repeat this process 2-3 times. (Doing this avoids a possible issue with drug loss due to surface transfer - i.e., a small amount of drug adheres to the inside of the syringe.)

 

Thank you!!

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Did you switch so that all of your daily dose is liquid? I did pills and liquid and didn't notice any problems. Now that I'm down to 1 mg, it's all liquid of course.

 

Hey JWL, thanks for the tip. I’m not that great with math and measuring so I’m just trying to go the simplest rout while avoiding symptom upticks just from changing delivery methods

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Did you switch so that all of your daily dose is liquid? I did pills and liquid and didn't notice any problems. Now that I'm down to 1 mg, it's all liquid of course.

 

Hey JWL, thanks for the tip. I’m not that great with math and measuring so I’m just trying to go the simplest rout while avoiding symptom upticks just from changing delivery methods

 

:thumbsup: I think that's the best way to go. Just use the liquid for the 1 mg you're trying to taper

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Did you switch so that all of your daily dose is liquid? I did pills and liquid and didn't notice any problems. Now that I'm down to 1 mg, it's all liquid of course.

 

Hey JWL, thanks for the tip. I’m not that great with math and measuring so I’m just trying to go the simplest rout while avoiding symptom upticks just from changing delivery methods

 

:thumbsup: I think that's the best way to go. Just use the liquid for the 1 mg you're trying to taper

 

Im in 7mg. Think I should just straight cross to liquid and do that the whole way down?

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Hello again, Amlsucks.  I wanted to clarify that, like Jwl, I used a combination of regular tablets and liquid until I reached the lowest dose I could take in tablet form. Then I switched to all liquid.  It’s a good strategy that has worked well for many members.

 

If you take your 7mg of diazepam in one dose, you could take 5mg in tablet form and 2mg in liquid form.  You would make reductions in your dose using the liquid portion. Speaking of liquids, I see you are in the US.  Are you aware that an FDA-approved, 5mg/5mL oral solution of diazepam is available via prescription?  We have quite a few members who use it to taper.  Some of them use the oral solution “as is,” others dilute it with water.  You can learn more by visiting the Valium/Diazepam Support Group. 

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Sorry I guess I should've been more clear. You're at 7 mgs and pills come in 2 mg tablets. So you would take 3- 2mg pills (6mgs) and reduce 1 ml of liquid. Once you're done with that you'll take 2 1/2 pills (5 mgs) and reduce 1 ml liquid and so on. I personally think it will be easier on your body.
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Sorry I guess I should've been more clear. You're at 7 mgs and pills come in 2 mg tablets. So you would take 3- 2mg pills (6mgs) and reduce 1 ml of liquid. Once you're done with that you'll take 2 1/2 pills (5 mgs) and reduce 1 ml liquid and so on. I personally think it will be easier on your body.

I see. Thank you for the tip... I’m just wondering why a liquid would cause symptom upticks if it’s essentially the same... just compounded. I HAVE heard people not being able to tolerate liquid though.. so I don’t know. I wish I was better with the scale lol

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Sorry I guess I should've been more clear. You're at 7 mgs and pills come in 2 mg tablets. So you would take 3- 2mg pills (6mgs) and reduce 1 ml of liquid. Once you're done with that you'll take 2 1/2 pills (5 mgs) and reduce 1 ml liquid and so on. I personally think it will be easier on your body.

I see. Thank you for the tip... I’m just wondering why a liquid would cause symptom upticks if it’s essentially the same... just compounded. I HAVE heard people not being able to tolerate liquid though.. so I don’t know. I wish I was better with the scale lol

 

I don't know why but many have to adjust to liquid. That's why I like a pill/liquid combo. Yes, liquid is so much easier to micro taper than dry cutting

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Sorry I guess I should've been more clear. You're at 7 mgs and pills come in 2 mg tablets. So you would take 3- 2mg pills (6mgs) and reduce 1 ml of liquid. Once you're done with that you'll take 2 1/2 pills (5 mgs) and reduce 1 ml liquid and so on. I personally think it will be easier on your body.

I see. Thank you for the tip... I’m just wondering why a liquid would cause symptom upticks if it’s essentially the same... just compounded. I HAVE heard people not being able to tolerate liquid though.. so I don’t know. I wish I was better with the scale lol

 

There's absolutely no reason why liquid should be different from pills.

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Tell that to people who've had to adjust including me

 

In many cases, those people were not stable even before the CO and they think their symptoms were due to the CO. In many other cases, those people were changing around doses of other medications, which also destabilizes the CNS. It's a basic rule in science to change only one thing at a time.

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Bottom line, I guess, is that while there should be little reason for the effects to change, some people find a need to do a small increase in their dosage. 

 

Please let us know what you observe when you make your switch.

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Tell that to people who've had to adjust including me

 

In many cases, those people were not stable even before the CO and they think their symptoms were due to the CO. In many other cases, those people were changing around doses of other medications, which also destabilizes the CNS. It's a basic rule in science to change only one thing at a time.

 

Whether they're stable or not there's an adjustment to be made. I know people who react to different brands of liquid. I think it's irresponsible to downplay it just because you've done fine

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Tell that to people who've had to adjust including me

 

In many cases, those people were not stable even before the CO and they think their symptoms were due to the CO. In many other cases, those people were changing around doses of other medications, which also destabilizes the CNS. It's a basic rule in science to change only one thing at a time.

 

Whether they're stable or not there's an adjustment to be made. I know people who react to different brands of liquid. I think it's irresponsible to downplay it just because you've done fine

 

My point is if they were not stable, it is impossible to tell what caused the symptoms, the underlying instability or the change to liquid. Can you tell me what brands of valium liquid are available?

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I can only speak from experience and other's post. As you can see from my profile, I had to hold for awhile to adjust to my last 1 ml of liquid D. After my 2 year hold, I was completely stable, no symptoms at all. I'm guessing liquid is metabolized at a different rate than pills. I'm objecting to your blanket statement that no one should feel any difference. I'm suggesting that some who are hyper sensitive do.
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I can only speak from experience and other's post. As you can see from my profile, I had to hold for awhile to adjust to my last 1 ml of liquid D. After my 2 year hold, I was completely stable, no symptoms at all. I'm guessing liquid is metabolized at a different rate than pills. I'm objecting to your blanket statement that no one should feel any difference. I'm suggesting that some who are hyper sensitive do.

 

It's unclear from your profile at what point you switched to diazepam and what happened before (how fast you tapered).

 

Also, you're talking about methylation issues. Did you measure methylation?

 

I stand by my conclusion that liquid shouldn't affect anybody.

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